Last Updated: Thursday, February 23, 2017
    Browsers

I hope you'll find something useful here:

A quote from ZDNET.com: ""You don't have to worry about Internet Explorer anymore."

It's hard to imagine today that there once was a time, long ago, when Internet Explorer was the most advanced browser.

But after years of neglect, IE lost its edge, and it was overtaken, at least among the cognoscenti, by Mozilla's Firefox and then by Google's Chrome.

The most recent releases of Internet Explorer are solid, competent, and even innovative. But they suffer from compatibility headaches made up of equal parts benign neglect and hostility from web developers. The modern web isn't built for or tested on Internet Explorer.

I have no idea what the answer is. Maybe a future Windows release could give customers a choice of third-party rendering engines (Chromium's Blink, Firefox's Gecko) into the default Windows browser, thereby swatting compatibility problems with a single blow.

But it's clear that Internet Explorer isn't good enough to be considered the primary browser today except in legacy installations

WINDOWS 10:

The browsers and e-mail capabilities provided with Win 10 are rather puny and what is provided is basic, especially in their e- mails from "live".

Windows 10 comes with TWO browsers; One is called EDGE and the other the familiar Internet Explorer, but neither is much good and both are spies as nearly as I've been able to figure out.  They're also a PIA to learn, are limited in add-ons and extensions compared to all other browsers worth their salt, and unintuitive.  YMMV of course, and that's OK, but I dont' recommend either one and especially their "live" email which is about useless.  IIRC they both use IE11.  Before you start donating all your e-mail to these browsers, I highly recommend checking their reputations and user's comments from unbiased sites.  'Nuff said.

My favorite browser is from Mozilla.org, and is Open Source, actively updated, and chock full of protections and features you can add to it.  It's called Firefox .  I use it as my Browser at all times and the days of sites not accepting it are nearly a thing of the past. 

I have found Mozilla's Fire Fox Browser   (www.mozilla.org) to be a great alternative to InterneExplorer.   Other contenders are continually coming up and several of them are good.  The thing do do really is find the one that works best for you and that you feel the most comfortable with in features and capabilities.

 Some sites are beginning to require FF in fact, over IE. And yet I have a couple of trusted and important sites that require IE so I can't dispense with either browser completely. Be sure to consider that before you uninstall one of the other. NOTE: You can minimize but not run install  I E because it is an integral part of the Operating System in XP and earlier.

Chrome is another browser working to gain market share but though it seems to be a good browser, iit has a few nuances and irritations I find bad enough to make it a lot less than desirable.  I was particularly irritated to discover that I couldn't Export my Favortes and Mail settnigs to IE or FF. Looked to me like they wanted to be a turfgrabber as MS used to be with its browsers.
   I dropped it for those reasons and haven't looked back so if they've fixed that, I don't know about it. Screw me once and I'm gone, usually for good, as in the Chrome case

For me, Mozilla's FireFox is THE browser of choice! 

E-MAIL:

     For e-mail, which really isn't really provided with Win 10, I use and highly recommend Mozilla.org's THUNDERBIRD . This is a fully featured e-mail and newsgroup, etc. application and I highly recommend it.  It's perfect in every way but one in my opinion: There is a bit of a earning curve to programming in new email addresses.  Their instructions for adding new addresses is a little cryptic and takes a bit of learning. But, it does have TEST buttons along the way to see if you have it programmed correctly.  So it doesn't leave you hanging if you heaven't programmed it correctly; it makes sure a connection can be achieved BEFORE it lets you test or access it.  It also gives an analysis of hints as to why it failed.  See mozilla.org for more information.

    I am only talking about Windows here, but most browsers today have versions for MAC, Apple etc..

  

   Copyright  2017; All Rights Reserved by twaynesdomain.com.  No material of any kind may be reproduced in any manner nor displayed anywhere without explicit written permission of the copyright holder, namely Tom Rivet.Unless indicated otherwise on specific pages.

By Viewing any page on this website you are bound by all Policies  and Regulations in effect at the time of your visit. Ignorance of the Policies is not an excuse for violating them.

LOGO-twaynesdomaincom